What is the Triduum

 

An excerpt from 6 things you need to know about the Triduum by Jimmy Akin.

1. What does “Triduum” mean?

It comes from Latin roots that mean, essentially, “the three days” or “period of three days” (tri- = three, -dies = days).

Today it refers to the liturgical season that follows Lent and precedes the Easter season.

According to the main document governing the celebrations connected with Easter, Paschales Solemnitatis:

38. . . . This time is called “the triduum of the crucified, buried and risen”; it is also called the “Easter Triduum” because during it is celebrated the Paschal Mystery, that is, the passing of the Lord from this world to his Father.

2. When does Triduum begin and end?

According to the General Norms for the Liturgical Year and the Calendar:

19. The Easter triduum begins with the evening Mass of the Lord’s Supper, reaches its high point in the Easter Vigil, and closes with evening prayer on Easter Sunday.

This means that Triduum thus runs from the evening of Holy Thursday to the evening of Easter Sunday.

It thus includes three full days, though since the season doesn’t begin at midnight, these three days are distributed as follows:

  1. The last part of Holy Thursday
  2. Good Friday
  3. Holy Saturday
  4. The first part of Easter Sunday

3. Why is Triduum important?

According to the General Norms:

18. Christ redeemed us all and gave perfect glory to God principally through his paschal mystery: dying he destroyed our death and rising he restored our life.

Therefore the Easter triduum of the passion and resurrection of Christ is the culmination of the entire liturgical year. Thus the solemnity of Easter has the same kind of preeminence in the liturgical year that Sunday has in the week.

4. How is fasting observed in this season?

According to Paschales Solemnitatis:

39. The Easter fast is sacred on the first two days of the Triduum, during which, according to ancient tradition, the Church fasts “because the Spouse has been taken away.”

Good Friday is a day of fasting and abstinence; it is also recommended that Holy Saturday be so observed, in order that the Church with uplifted and welcoming heart be ready to celebrate the joys of the Sunday of the resurrection.

Fasting and abstinence are thus required on Good Friday and fasting is recommended on Holy Saturday.

(Note: These days are reckoned as beginning at midnight. Good Friday begins at 12:01 a.m. Friday, not at the Mass of the Lord’s Supper the preceding evening.)

The complete original article can be found at this link.

Good Friday Walk

Dear Walker,

We are looking forward to the 36th Annual Good Friday Walk. Last year’s walk brought over 500 walkers together on Good Friday to raise funds which were distributed throughout the year to 273 North Shore families. Last year’s outgoing donations to those in need totaled $73,954. Requests for help with rent, utility bills and general assistance arrive every week.

Ninety-five percent of all donations in 2014 were distributed on the North Shore. Five percent of our budget was used for other expenses, which were limited to printing, postage, website and organization fees. The Good Friday Walk is organized by a 100% volunteer workforce.

The walk begins Friday morning at St. John the Evangelist Church/School.

For more info please go to Good Friday Walk’s website,  http://www.goodfridaywalk.org/

Easter Vigil Celebration

There will be a celebration immediately following the Easter Vigil in the Lower Church of St. Mary Star of the Sea. Please come and bring an appetizer or dessert to share. If you are attending, an RSVP by Wednesday April 1 (TODAY) would be most helpful. Please contact Evangeline Egizi at 978-998-6848 or egizi@smsbeverly.com.

Pope Francis on the Triduum

Pope Francis kisses a foot of a disabled person at the S. Maria della Provvidenza church in Rome, during the Holy Thursday celebration

The Easter Triduum – the Pope said – is the apex of our liturgical year and it is also the apex of our lives as Christians.

We begin the Triduum – he continued – by celebrating the Mass of the Lord’s Supper, as we recall Christ’s offering of his body and blood to the Father, which he gave to the Apostles as food for their nourishment, with the command that they perpetually celebrate these mysteries in his memory.

He said we also recall the Lord washing the Apostles’ feet, through which he showed that the “purpose of his life and passion was to serve God and neighbour, a service which we are called to imitate by loving one another as he loved us”.

For more of Pope Francis’ remarks please go to Vatican Radio at this link.

What is the Chrism Mass?

 

 

The Chrism Mass – What is it?

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The Mass of Chrism comes once a year to your cathedral. If you’ve never celebrated it, you’re missing one of the most solemn and significant liturgies of our church. During the Mass, your bishop will bless the oil of catechumens, the oil of the sick, and the oil of chrism. We use the first for adult catechumens and infants, the second for anointing the sick, and the sacred oil of chrism for baptism, confirmation, the ordination of priests, and the consecration of altars. All three are basically an olive oil; chrism spices the air with the scent of a perfume, traditionally balsam. For pastoral reasons, another vegetable oil and perfume may be used.

To continue reading please continue here. From Chrism Mass by Paul Turner.